Principle 7

Respect

Create a culture of respect not only for the garden, but for each other, and the planet
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Garden Respect

Fostering positive behaviours and associations between students and the garden is important. Doing so promotes self-maintaining systems that actually discourage inappropriate behaviour in the garden and its care. Focus on teaching kids to be open, to see and accept the results of their actions or inactions, and listen to and consider criticism from others.
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Global Respect

Food and agriculture are closely tied to culture, and the world we live in can often be seen as big, disjointed and disconnected. Whilst fostering positive behaviours and associations between students and the garden is important, creating a space where students learn to respect each other, and their impact on the planet is just as important! 

Wiridjiribin
Nura

Wiridjiribin Nura (or Lyrebird Country), means this space is inclusive for all. Watch and learn about how gardens are being used to generate respect and enrichment for culture and country.

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Inspiring Examples

inspiration
A horticultural gardening program for female prisoners at the Alice Springs Correctional Centre, aims to equip prisoners with practical skills and build up their confidence in the process, whilst also boosting their mental health.
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Inspiration

Green-Bronx Machine

Founded by Stephen Ritz, this organisation empowers school children in disadvantaged communities to live healthy lives after seeing how interconnected health, wellness and academic performance are.
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Civil Eats

Civil Eats is a daily news source for critical thought about the American food system. We publish stories that shift the conversation around sustainable agriculture in an effort to build economically and socially just communities.
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Guerilla Gardening

Check out how Ron Finley plants vegetable gardens in South Central LA to bring communities together.

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